Jamaican Facts

                                          


 

History

Facts About Jamaica


History


Q. History of Manchester

The Parish of Manchester is located in west-central Jamaica, in the county of Middlesex. Its capital, Mandeville, is a major business centre, and the only parish capital not located on the coast or on a major river. The Right Excellent Norman Washington Manley, one of Jamaica's seven National Heroes, was born in this parish.



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Q. Mandeville

 

Mandeville is the capital and largest town in the parish of Manchester in the county of  Middlesex, Jamaica.  In 2005, the town had an estimated population of 50,000, and including the immediate suburbs within a radius of 16 km, the total population  is about 72,000.  It is located on an inland plateau at an altitude of 628 m (2061 feet) and is 103 km west of Kingston.Mandeville has a town square, parish church and clock tower and many large, elegant early nineteenth-century houses line the winding streets in the town center.  
The grassy square is somewhat like a village green and Mandeville has been described as  the most English town in Jamaica. In the suburbs of the town many large houses have been built by returning residents  from North America and the United Kingdom on an ad hoc basis.

Prominent suburbs and surrounding areas include Ingleside, Battersea, Knockpatrick, Clover, Waltham, Bloomfield, Caledonia Meadows, Brumalia, Newport, Spur Tree, Kingsland, French Park, Swabys Hope, Lincoln, Greenvale and Marshalls Pen. Mandeville is a major commercial centre and is the home of Northern Caribbean University (formerly West Indies College), a Seventh-day Adventist institution of higher learning.

 



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Facts About Jamaica


Q. Geography of Jamaica

 

 

 

Jamaica is the third largest island in the Caribbean, 4,213 square miles, 146 miles from east to west and at her widest 51 miles from St Ann's Bay in the north to Portland Point in the south, lying 90 miles south of Cuba, and 118 miles west of Haiti.

A mountain range runs from east to west.  The Blue Mountains, at the eastern end, rise to 7,402 feet, and Birch's Hill at the western end a mere 1809 feet, and on a clear morning the views from Blue Mountain Peak are spectacular.

As the sun comes up you can see Cuba, but since you are over a mile and a quarter above sea level the view is more often than not filled with low lying early morning mist.

Nearly half of the island is over 1000ft and the majority of the island's surface is made up of very thick layers of limestone. 

The Blue Mountains are formed by underlying igneous and metamorphic rock protruding through this limestone.

Streams that rise in the mountains sink again when they reach the lower limestone areas, and leaching over the years has resulted in the formation of numerous caves throughout the island, and even underwater caves along the coast.


 



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